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Posts Tagged ‘110’

Baby’s First 5K

#110 and #144 prior to the start of the 2011 Jingle Bell 5K.

Welcome to Adventure Foot!  I’m not quite ready for my new blog’s grand debut yet, but that doesn’t mean that I’m going to wait to post some new content.  The Annual Jingle Bell 5K Run for the Arthritis Foundation was held Saturday, December 3rd at the Quincy Mall.  The usual running suspects of Quincy showed up despite the cold and rainy weather, but if you looked closely at the crowd, you saw a few new faces too. My friend Mary Poletti came dressed to the nines in her Christmas gear to take part in the 5K walk.  It was her first such event, and I was really proud of her for coming out to give this event a try.  

Another new face in the crowd was my dear friend Doug Burdic.  He’s decided to guest blog and tell you the story himself.  I’m extremely happy he decided to join me for this run and also very proud of him for a strong showing.  I won’t gush about it (because he’d hate that) but I know that he’s got what it takes to be a very good runner and that this is only the beginning of him following his foot out the door for adventure.  I just hope he remembers me when he gets so fast that I can’t keep up with him anymore.

-Laura Sievert

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Baby’s First 5K

By Doug Burdic

First, full disclosure:  I smoked fairly heavily for ten years until my lung collapsed of its own volition in early May, presumably from the sheer weight of the tar, or maybe just because it was tired of being picked on.  After a stint in lovely room 5420 at Blessing (overrated as vacation spots go), I decided it was time to think about exercising.  And think I did.  Thinking about it wasn’t exactly the same as doing it, but it felt good to at least know it was on my mind.  For six months I thought about it.

So when Laura texted me to see if I wanted to run a 5K in December, I replied, “OK.”

Then, out loud, to an empty room, I said, “Oops.”

And so it came to be that on a freezing December morning, I found myself behind the mall with a decidedly upbeat crew of people who were used to this sort of thing.  I was, of course, completely unprepared.  My training regimen had consisted of a couple tries at two-mile runs and not drinking as much beer that week.  I had my awesome K-Swiss tennis shoes on, which are about four years old.  They had custom ventilation (read: holes) and would be consigned to lawn-mowing duty when spring came.

Doug Burdic, Laura, Ali Berti, Brenda Turnbaugh and Jeff Spencer after the Jingle Bell Run.

The weather was just lovely. I noted that perfect Bermuda triangle of rain, mist and possibly my own tears as we prepared to begin what was sure to be…something.  People did jumping jacks to get loose.  I did three, which seemed sufficient.  And the gun went off.

I was joined by Laura and her friend Jeff, who’d done 13 miles already that morning and looked like he could get another baker’s dozen in before lunch.  After a strong start (maybe made it out of the parking lot) I faded.  Everything below my knees hurt.  Most of the things above my knees hurt.  We ran through the Avenue of Lights in Moorman Park, which was kind of nice and mostly flat.  We mostly chatted throughout, though once in a while, Laura would pick a spot to run to and I would respond with a profanity.  Things were going fairly well, really.  No torn ACLs.  No CPR.  I was both emboldened and too worn out to do anything about it.

The last interminable mile, Laura and Jeff waxed poetic amongst themselves about something as I scouted out good spots to vomit along Columbus Road for when the opportunity inevitably presented itself.  Then the finish line came into view back at the mall and I figured if I hadn’t collapsed yet, now wasn’t the time.  I crossed the line in 36 minutes and change.  People seemed excited.  I was too tired to be proud.

I should’ve learned something from the experience, and I suppose I learned that it wouldn’t kill me to do more of this stuff.  So if they keep giving me a T-shirt, I’ll keep running in their races.

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